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Coline Pinese

Coline Pinese

Associate professor, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montpellier

Coline has been working at the chemistry/biology interface since her doctorate CIFRE obtained in 2014. Her objective was to design hybrid collagen/PLA based copolymer biomaterials for ligament regeneration. She then continued her work at the interface by studying bioactive surfaces functionalized by peptides (antibacterial, osteointegration, wound healing…). Then she became involved into spinal cord regeneration through an association mRNA or siRNA/ nanofibers at Nayang Technological University, Singapore. She finally joined the DBA team as an Associate Professor to develop polymer/peptide hybrid nanomaterials.

Contact:

tel: +33 4 11 75 97 10

coline.pinese@umontpellier.fr

5 recent publications:

  • W.Ong, C. Pinese, SY Chew, Scaffold-mediated  Sequential  Drug/Gene  Delivery  to  Promote  Nerve  Regeneration  and Remyelination following Traumatic Nerve Injuries, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews (2018) (IF=17.28)
  • Pinese, JQ. Lin, U. Milbreta, Y. Wang, KW. Leong, SY Chew, Sustained delivery of siRNA/mesoporous silica nanoparticle complexes from nanofiber scaffolds for long-term gene silencing. Acta Biomater. 76, 164–177 (2018). (IF=6.38)
  • Gangolphe, S. Déjean, A. Bethry, S. Hunger, C. Pinese, X. Garric, F. Bossard, B. Nottelet, Degradable multi(aryl-azide) star copolymer as universal photo-crosslinker for elastomeric scaffolds, Materials Today Chemistry 12, (2019) 209-221 (IF=NA)

Direct synthesis of peptide-containing silicone. A new way for bioactive materials

Chem. Eur. J. 10.1002/chem.202001571

Ahmad Mehdi, Martin Julie, Mohammad Wehbi, Cecile Echalier, Sylvie hunger, Audrey Bethry, Xavier garric, coline Pinese, jean Martinez, Lubomir vezenkov, and gilles subra

ABSTRACT

A simple and efficient way to synthesize peptide-containing silicone materials is described. Silicone oils containing a chosen ratio of bioactive peptide sequences were prepared by acid-catalyzed copolymerization of dichlorodimethylsilane, hybrid dichloromethyl peptidosilane and either Si-vinyl or Si-H functionalized monomers. Functionalized silicone oils were first obtained and then after hydrosilylation cross-linking, bioactive PDMS based materials were straightforward obtained. The introduction of an antibacterial peptide yields PDMS materials showing an interesting activity against Staphylococcus Aureus. In the same way, RGD ligands-containing PDMS demonstrated improved cell adhesion properties. This generic method was fully compatible with the stability of peptides and thus opened the way to the synthesis of a wide range of biologically active silicones.

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Biomimicking Fiber Platform with Tunable Stiffness to Study Mechanotransduction Reveals Stiffness Enhances Oligodendrocyte Differentiation but Impedes Myelination through YAP‐Dependent Regulation

Small 2020, 2003656

William Ong, Nicolas Marinval, Junquan Lin, Mui Hoon Nai, Yee-Song Chong, Coline Pinese, Sreedharan Sajikumar, Chwee Teck Lim, Charles Ffrench-Constant, Marie E. Bechler, and Sing Yian Chew

ABSTRACT

A key hallmark of many diseases, especially those in the central nervous system (CNS), is the change in tissue stiffness due to inflammation and scarring. However, how such changes in microenvironment affect the regenerative process remains poorly understood. Here, a biomimicking fiber platform that provides independent variation of fiber structural and intrinsic stiffness is reported. To demonstrate the functionality of these constructs as a mechanotransduction study platform, these substrates are utilized as artificial axons and the effects of axon structural versus intrinsic stiffness on CNS myelination are independently analyzed. While studies have shown that substrate stiffness affects oligodendrocyte differentiation, the effects of mechanical stiffness on the final functional state of oligodendrocyte (i.e., myelination) has not been shown prior to this. Here, it is demonstrated that a stiff mechanical microenvironment impedes oligodendrocyte myelination, independently and distinctively from oligodendrocyte differentiation. Yes-associated protein is identified to be involved in influencing oligodendrocyte myelination through mechanotransduction. The opposing effects on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination provide important implications for current work screening for promyelinating drugs, since these efforts have focused mainly on promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation. Thus, the platform may have considerable utility as part of a drug discovery program in identifying molecules that promote both differentiation and myelination.

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Turning peptides into bioactive nylons

Eur. Polym. J. 2020, 135, 109886.

Said Jebors*, Coline Pinese*, Titouan Montheil*, Audrey Bethry, Simon Verquin, Louise Plais, Marie Moulin, Chloé Dupont, Xavier Garric, Ahmad Mehdi, Jean Martinez, Gilles Subra

Turning peptides into bioactive nylons

ABSTRACT

New synthetic textiles with physical and/or biological properties are increasingly used in medical applications. While a simple textile coating is usually carried out to obtain biological properties, covalent grafting should be considered for long-term applications. Herein, we have developed a new hybrid bioactive nylon whose synthesis involves a peptide sequence with a diacyl derivative. Numerous types of peptide-nylons were prepared by varying the molar percentage (0.1 %, 1 % and 10%) and orientation of the peptide in the polymer backbone. Nylons incorporating antibacterial peptides significantly inhibited S. aureus proliferation whereas nylons functionalized with cell-adhesive peptide enhanced the proliferation of L929 fibroblast. These results show that the incorporation of the peptides directly into the nylon skeleton is efficient and provides biological properties that suggest new ways of functionalizing biomedical textiles.

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Biomimicking Fiber Scaffold as an Effective In Vitro and In Vivo MicroRNA Screening Platform for Directing Tissue Regeneration

Adv. Sci. 6, 1800808 (2019)

Na Zhang, Ulla Milbreta, Jiah Shin Chin, Coline Pinese, Junquan Lin, Hitomi Shirahama, Wei Jiang, Hang Liu, Ruifa Mi, Ahmet Hoke, Wutian Wu and Sing Yian Chew

ABSTRACT

MicroRNAs effectively modulate protein expression and cellular response. Unfortunately, the lack of robust nonviral delivery platforms has limited the therapeutic application of microRNAs. Additionally, there is a shortage of drug‐screening platforms that are directly translatable from in vitro to in vivo. Here, a fiber substrate that provides nonviral delivery of microRNAs for in vitro and in vivo microRNA screening is introduced. As a proof of concept, difficult‐to‐transfect primary neurons are targeted and the efficacy of this system is evaluated in a rat spinal cord injury model. With this platform, enhanced gene‐silencing is achieved in neurons as compared to conventional bolus delivery (p < 0.05). Thereafter, four well‐recognized microRNAs (miR‐21, miR‐222, miR‐132, and miR‐431) and their cocktails are screened systematically. Regardless of age and origin of the neurons, similar trends are observed. Next, this fiber substrate is translated into a 3D system for direct in vivo microRNA screening. Robust nerve ingrowth is observed as early as two weeks after scaffold implantation. Nerve regeneration in response to the microRNA cocktails is similar to in vitro experiments. Altogether, the potential of the fiber platform is demonstrated in providing effective microRNA screening and direct translation into in vivo applications.